Researchers at the University of Sydney say they can turn the waste from durian and jackfruit into carbon aerogel, which can help store energy in what are called super-capacitors. And no, they don’t smell. Plus: Daniele Barresi is a master of making ornate sculpted art from avocados.

Scientists turn stinky durian waste into energy storage (Treehugger)

Daniele Barresi’s Avocado Sculptures 

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If your durian fruit experiments work, does that cancel out the sweet smell of success?

Durian is, of course, the smelliest fruit ever.

We told you last year about how someone brought durian into a university library and the stench was so bad, they suspected a gas leak and evacuated the building!

Well, durian has its fans, too (of the taste, not the smell), and researchers at the University of Sydney say they can add a notch to the fruit’s plus column: it can help charge our devices.

The waste from durian and jackfruit can be turned into a carbon aerogel, which become part of what are called super-capacitors, which store energy and then parcel it out smoothly and consistently.

It may be a big breakthrough for super-fast charging and for energy storage that doesn’t involve fossil fuels.

And no, you don’t have to put on a gas mask while you attach your power cable to these durian-powered power sources.

Fruit can also be turned into art.

Avocado is a fruit. (There, I said it.)

And avocado can make great art, judging by the ornate sculptures by Daniele Barresi.

His food art is magnificent, and as Neatorama pointed out, the avocado’s outer skin is sort of like a built-in frame.