There’s a website that shows seven sites on which European castles once stood – only partial structures now, but the site has filled the towers and other structures back in. Plus: the blare of a neighborhood car alarm gives Brooklyn musician Andrea Long Chu some inspiration.

This Is What 7 Castles Across Europe Looked Like Before Falling Into Ruins (Bored Panda)

This Woman Transforms An Annoying Car Alarm Into A Stroke Of Musical Genius (Digg)

Our Patreon backers are pretty inspirational, come to think of it

And so augmented reality castles melt into the sea, eventually.

Before you know it, warmer weather will be here, and we will probably still be here at home, not really going anywhere.

And yet, in a way, many of us can go anywhere these days, at least if we can get online.

We’ve talked about the many virtual tours you can take of museums and galleries.

You can tour some of the most famous World Heritage Sites without ever leaving the couch, and if you spend some on map sites you can visit pretty much any address you can think up.

As if all that wasn’t enough, you can also travel through time.

There’s a site that shows seven sites on which European castles once stood.

In our time there are only partial structures left at best, or ruins, in some cases.

But we know what was there.

So the website uses the same approach as augmented reality systems.

Just as there are apps that let you hold up your phone or a virtual reality system at a geographic location and see images and information that you can’t see in the real world, this site takes the photos of the existing castle structures and adds back in what used to be there.

Walls that just sort of end?

Now you can see the towers and other features that would have stood there too.

I mean, if we’re virtually traveling anyway, why not make the most of the trip?

We’ve heard a lot lately about neighbors trying to connect with each other even when they can’t be together.

This story is more a neighborhood coincidence than anything else, but it’s still pretty great.

Andrea Long Chu is a musician living in Brooklyn, and in her neighborhood a loud car alarm kept going off.

That’s usually not ideal for a musician.

But she noticed that car alarms are essentially musical notes, and ones that go off in a fixed pattern, so there’s a rhythm there.

As the alarm blared, she recorded herself improvising along with the noise on her keyboard.

She kept playing after the alarm stopped, and when it picked back up, it was almost still in sync with her playing!