A project run by researchers at the University of Sheffield, is using foam taken from discarded mattresses to help Syrian refugees start hydroponic gardens in Jordan. Plus: why were there two Miss Sasquatch Queens in Saskatchewan back in 1969?

Scientists using old mattresses to grow food for Syrian refugees in Jordan (iNews)

Miss Sasquatch Queen (Weird Universe)

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Gardeners: got your seeds? Gloves? Hat? Old discarded mattresses?

Today we’re talking about a project that involves a hallmark of spring: gardening.

The project, run by researchers at the University of Sheffield, is surprising in a lot of ways.

For one, this is hydroponic gardening, in which gardeners use something other than soil in which to grow their plants.

In this case, the soil is actually bits of foam taken from discarded mattresses.

Instead of chucking them in landfills, the mattresses are put into containers with a nutrient mix.

The scientists say this method uses significantly less water than the usual ways.

What’s also notable here is that the gardeners here are Syrian refugees living in Jordan.

The scientists say this could be a way to get fresh food to those who may need it.

But they also say it’s a way to help improve the mental health of refugees, many of whom know how to grow plants and enjoy doing so.

To flee violence and destruction and come to a place where you can grow something and care for it might feel a little bit hopeful.

And the researchers say those who participate in this early stage of the project could train others.

There could be hydroponic gardens growing all across the desert.

The website Weird Universe noted recently the story of a winter carnival in Saskatchewan which awarded a woman called Laura Medland the title of “Miss Sasquatch Queen.”

From all accounts it was meant as an honor, not an insult. The catch was that a hotel in the community of Regina had crowned Dona Doan as its Sasquatch Queen.

Anybody know whether they just had two Sasquatch queens in the province that year, or did they decide there could be only one?