The US Almost Had Coins Worth A Tenth Of A Cent (Cool Weird Awesome 1061)

Around this time in 1935, the US government was making a big decision about some small amounts of money: there was a push to create a kind of currency worth a tenth of a cent. 

By |2023-08-02T09:52:02-04:00August 2, 2023|Categories: Cool Weird Awesome, Podcasts|Tags: , , , |

There’s A Lunchbox Museum In Columbus, Georgia (Cool Weird Awesome 979)

Last week was school spring break where I live, so today all the families are back to packing backpacks, putting homework in folders and packing lunches.  Maybe next spring break we should head to Columbus, Georgia to visit the Lunchbox Museum.

By |2024-04-03T08:36:20-04:00April 3, 2023|Categories: Cool Weird Awesome, Podcasts|Tags: , , |

A Comanche Code Talker Sent The First Message From Utah Beach On D-Day (Cool Weird Awesome 886)

For Veterans Day, the story of the Comanche Code Talkers, 17 veterans of the second World War who created an unbroken code in their native language that saved lives and helped the US military effort. 

Billy Mills Pulled Off One Of The Greatest Upsets In Olympic History (Cool Weird Awesome 800)

Today in 1938, the birthday of Billy Mills, a Marine veteran, activist and runner who won an Olympic gold medal in what’s been called the biggest upset in the history of the Games.

A Chef Got Irritated With A Wealthy Diner And That’s Why We Have Potato Chips (Cool Weird Awesome 731)

It's National Potato Chip Day, so of course we’re going to take you through the history of potato chips and the story of chef George Crum, the man sometimes called “the Edison of grease.”

String Figures Help Tell Indigenous Stories Across The World (Cool Weird Awesome 704)

For many Native people in the U.S. and beyond, this is a time of year to tell stories with string. Here's a little about how they work, and why in some cultures they're only told in winter.

Edmonia Lewis, A Sculptor Who Brought Her Subjects To Life (Cool Weird Awesome 631)

On Indigenous Peoples Day, here's the story of sculptor Edmonia Lewis. She was born in the 1840s to a Black father and a Chippewa mother, and became the first Native American and Black woman to become an acclaimed sculptor.

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