Slime Molds Can Remember Stuff Even Though They Don’t Have Brains (Cool Weird Awesome 484)

Physarum polycephalum is pretty smart for a slime mold. It can find its way back to the places where food had previously been even though it doesn't have a nervous system. Researchers in Germany have just figured out how this organism does it. Plus: American Beatlemania may have begun in February 1964, but George Harrison had made a nice, quiet trip to southern Illinois the previous fall.

2021-02-25T08:54:56-05:00February 25th, 2021|Categories: Cool Weird Awesome, Podcasts|Tags: , , , , |

Some Male Butterflies Make Their Mates Smell Bad On Purpose (Cool Weird Awesome 479)

New research shows certain types of male butterflies can create an anti-pheromone they cover their partners in, hoping that the smelly chemical will ward off other males. Definitely not the most thoughtful Valentine's Day gift ever. Plus: data analysis shows the language people use about their relationships can predict a breakup months before it happens!

2021-02-11T08:42:33-05:00February 11th, 2021|Categories: Cool Weird Awesome, Podcasts|Tags: , , , |

Pilot Whales Trick Their Predators By Mimicking Their Voices (Cool Weird Awesome 435)

A team out of New Curtin University in Australia has found that pilot whales appear to imitate one of their predators, tricking them away from the hunt. And in equally clever but much more irritating news, a neighborhood in Ottawa, Ontario reports squirrels are stealing the LED lights out of their holiday displays.

2020-12-07T09:56:31-05:00December 7th, 2020|Categories: Cool Weird Awesome, Podcasts|Tags: , , , , , |

The Greenland Shark Can Live For Hundreds Of Years, So Don’t Make It Mad (Cool Weird Awesome 422)

Scientists have determined that the Greenland shark lives longer than any known invertebrate, up to 400 years. How? We don't know, but it sure does seem chill about it. Plus: UK-based artist Sue Austin developed an underwater wheelchair, making the wide, wide sea a lot more accessible.

2020-11-18T07:56:11-05:00November 18th, 2020|Categories: Cool Weird Awesome, Podcasts|Tags: , , , , , |

Bats Can Predict Where Their Prey Is Headed (Cool Weird Awesome 414)

Bats use their own internal radar - echolocation - to figure out where insects are so they can swoop in and catch their meal. But a study out of Johns Hopkins University shows that how bats track their prey is more complicated than we thought. Plus: today in 2008, music fans named a certain pop and internet legend the Best Act Ever.

2020-11-06T08:17:16-05:00November 6th, 2020|Categories: Cool Weird Awesome, Podcasts|Tags: , , |

Humans Actually Do Perk Up Their Ears At Interesting Noises (Cool Weird Awesome 339)

Our entire show is based on the idea that we might say something interesting enough that it might get you to perk up your ears, figuratively speaking. Or, as a team at Saarland University has found, maybe not so figuratively speaking. Plus: a sculpture garden in Dublin, Ohio pays tribute to ears of a different kind.

2021-01-03T08:41:05-05:00July 10th, 2020|Categories: Cool Weird Awesome, Podcasts|Tags: , , , , , |

Otters Collect Rocks And Juggle Them (Cool Weird Awesome 297)

Otters are known to choose favorite rocks to carry around and juggle - it's a real sight to see. Researchers at the University of Exeter have been trying to figure out why otters juggle. Meanwhile: Juneau, Alaska just set up a joke hotline for residents looking for a laugh while staying at home.

2021-02-08T12:20:03-05:00May 13th, 2020|Categories: Cool Weird Awesome, Podcasts|Tags: , , , , |

When Cows Get Excited, They Tell Each Other About It (Cool Weird Awesome 224)

A PhD student at the University of Sydney, Alexandra Green, studied a herd of cows for more than five months to study what she called cattle vocal individuality. Cows, it turns out, have a lot to say to each other! Plus: the story of Manuela, a tortoise in Brazil who probably should've spoken up at some point.

2020-01-27T08:03:47-05:00January 27th, 2020|Categories: Cool Weird Awesome, Podcasts|Tags: , , , |
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